#SailingIntoBlackHistory

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First off APOLOGIES for not being consistent with posting on here like I was in the beginning! School and work have had me ragged y’all! But I am going to be back on it for a minute because I have a lot of things to talk about starting with the sailing trip around the world!

So… for those who may have missed it, after researching other people who have circumnavigatied the globe via sailboat, I have discovered that there has never been a Black American woman who has done it! So I will be making Black History!!
So… help us out and help me to keep #SailingIntoBlackHistory!

https://www.gofundme.com/ee-safetyequip

FYI…
First thing first is getting the boat ready to be seaworthy! Obviously circumnavigating the world is dangerous enough in the best circumstances so we don’t want to add boat issues to the mix. We have some of what we need to shore things up. We just need to get the rest and have her hauled out and maintained (some things can’t be done while she’s on the water and we’re living in her). For now the estimate of that is a bit over $2000 USD. We have the money to do all the things we need to do that can be done at mooring while we’re on her but just need that last little bit.

This campaign is set at $500 goal for the life vests. Anything we get over that will be used for the rest of the safety equipment upgrades.  We appreciate any small amount and every share/tweet/repost/etc.

THANKS SO MUCH FOR YOUR SUPPORT! ^_^

P.S.
Stay tuned for more info as I research companies from whom to request support for this potential milestone. :-)

me on the school ship x

Sketchbook Saturday 2017/06/24

Yet another flashback to my drawings from my teen years… I almost feel like I should post these as “Throwback Thursday” posts. I’m not going to, though. :-P

(Click to view larger image)

 

Sketch from October 1989

Sketch from October 1989

 

In 1989, I was really getting into more of the Black side of my being. The funny thing about that is it was because of my white cousin who I was hanging out with a lot at the time.

We use to joke that since I was raised by my white mom and white stepdad with their son my white brother in mostly white neighborhoods, I was basically white. In her case, she had a Black stepdad and halfbreed black sister and lived in mostly Black neighborhoods so she was in a lot of ways “Blacker” than me.

She was the one who told me about hair grease and finger waves and baby hairs and big earrings. The influence of the people and music she exposed me to shows a LOT in the art I did at the time.

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If you would like a print of anything that I post, feel free to hit me up in the comments or using the contact form below

Sketchbook Saturday 2017/06/17

Still reminiscing about summer 1989… 18 was a good year. :-)

 

Sketch from July 1989

Sketch from July 1989

 

I’m pretty sure that this is one that I did at my cousin’s man’s place. I think it may even have been drawn from a magazine ad or an article about someone who was famous at the time but I can’t remember now.

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If you would like a print of anything that I post, feel free to hit me up in the comments or using the contact form below

Sketchbook Saturday 2017/06/10

Another sketch from my teen years, June 1989 to be exact. Still somewhat of a self-portrait because I liked to draw things that reflected who I was.

 

Another sketch from my teen years, June 1989 to be exact.

Sketch from June 1989

 

I don’t remember if I drew this at home or at my cousin’s man’s place, but it was in that same era.

With this one, I am pretty sure I was challenging myself to get over my aversion to drawing a whole person. I hated drawing legs and feet and always felt like my proportions were off if I drew head to toe.

I think I did OK. :-)

 

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If you would like a print of anything that I post, feel free to hit me up in the comments or using the contact form below

Sketchbook Saturday 2017/06/03

Still going through my flashback sketches… this one is from 1989 when I was 18 years old. (Click image to enlarge.)

Still going through my flashback photos... this one is from 1989

Sketch from 1989

I’m pretty sure this was done after I graduated when I was hanging out with my (white) cousin and her (Black, white, and Asian) hoodlum gang banger friends.

We used to go over to her man’s apartment and just hang out there for HOURS and I would always take my sketchbook because I would get bored just sitting there listening to music (he didn’t have a TV).

I have a LOT of sketches from that summer.

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If you would like a print of anything that I post, feel free to hit me up in the comments or using the contact form below

Sketchbook Saturday 2017/05/27

When I was in high school I really liked drawing clothes. I also did a lot of self-portraits.

I think I was trying to emulate Frida Kahlo with the self-portraits.

I lived outside of town and hardly ever went anywhere since I didn’t have a car so I spent a lot of time alone. I was the only model available I guess.

(Click on the image to enlarge.)

 

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If you would like a print of anything that I post, feel free to hit me up in the comments or using the contact form below

Sketchbook Saturday 2017/05/20

Since I am relaunching, I think I am going to go through my sketchbook in chronological order. Here is another somewhat self-portrait drawn back in 1987 when I was 16 and a junior in high school. Click on the image to view it full size (the image is VERY big).

 

"Distraught" completed 9-2-87

“Distraught” completed 9-2-87

 

This one I took a while to draw. Unfortunately, I didn’t put the START date so I don’t know exactly how long. I wonder. Probably a few days working on it maybe a half hour to an hour at a time.

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If you would like a print of anything that I post, feel free to hit me up in the comments or using the contact form below

Black History 365 #9 – The first Black people to… establish an African Episcopal church

9--AAM_parchment_photo1829

African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas

9b--Absalom-Jones_Peale

Absalom Jones

Every day I will explore the obvious (and not so obvious) parts of American history that those called Black have taken part in. The things that we (Black people) have done other than being stolen from our homeland and made forced labor in a land foreign to us. I’m going to start this series by looking up the first time someone African-American did something and broke the color barrier in that activity or field. I’ll be starting with Wikipedia and working my way out:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_African-American_firsts

I will be learning a lot of this as I go since I am a product of the standardized Euro/Anglo/Caucasian leaning public school system. I hope you enjoy learning with me. I’ll be going down the list chronologically as it appears in the Wikipedia article.

Today we have a two-for-one. We will look at African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas and  Absalom Jones:

1794:  First African Episcopal Church established: Absalom Jones founded African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1804:  First African American ordained as an Episcopal priest in the U.S.: Absalom Jones in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas was founded in 1792 in PhiladelphiaPennsylvania, as the first black Episcopal Church in the United States. It developed from the Free African Society, a non-denominational group formed by blacks who left St. George’s Methodist Church because of discrimination. Led by Absalom Jones, a free black and lay Methodist preacher who became ordained in 1804 as a priest in the Episcopal Church, the Church became one of the major features in Philadelphia’s black cultural life.

Absalom Jones (1746 – February 13, 1818) was an African-American abolitionist and clergyman. After finding a black congregation in 1794, he was the first African American ordained as a priest in the Episcopal Church of the United States, in 1804. He is listed on the Episcopal calendar of saints and blessed under the date of his death, February 13, in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer as “Absalom Jones, Priest, 1818”.

The Church became the first black church in the country to purchase a pipe organ, and then the first to hire a black woman as organist, Ann Appo.

While the congregation has worshiped in several different buildings, it has remained continuously active since its founding. The original building, dedicated on July 17, 1794 at Fifth and Adelphi Streets, is under the passageway/plaza now known as St. James Place. The congregation is now located at the intersection of Overbrook and Lancaster Avenues in Philadelphia’s Overbrook Farms neighborhood. Other locations included Twelfth Street below Walnut Street, 57th and Pearl Streets, and 52nd and Parrish Streets. Clergy and parishioners were active in abolitionism and the Underground Railroad in the 19th century and in the modern Civil Rights Movement.